Lambing season

LambLambing season is between April and June on Mull. This is a wonderous sight with thousands of gorgeous lambs prancing around without a care in the world. Extra care should be taken when driving around during this time. Also, try not to get too close to the lambs, the mothers are very protective and by getting too close you will put un-needed pressure on the mother.


The Lighthouse walk

Tobermory LighthouseThe Lighthouse Walk is a nice easy excursion from Tobermory Harbour. Head towards the Calmac ferry port and take the path heading up hill into the trees. You can just keep on this path for an hour or so, until you reach the lighthouse. On the way you should have fantastic views of Ardnamurchan. On the way back you could try walking back over the golf course for some lovely views down the Sound of Mull. Watch out for stray golf balls though.


Boats

Boats, Tobermory HarbourBoats and other sea-going vessels that moor in Tobermory harbour are just as colourful and interesting as the shops, houses and inns that give the front it’s identity. All kinds of vessel can be seen in the harbour. The CalMac passenger ferry can be seen chugging up and down the sound of Mull on its long journey to Barra. Moored in the bay you will see two and three mast Schooners, Luxury yachts, the odd Ketch and most other type of boat you can think of. If you frequent the bars along the sea front you will no doubt pick up on many discussions of a nautical nature.


Mull Rally

For 45 years the Mull Rally has roared around the roads of Mull over the 2nd weekend in October.

Sponsored by Tunnock’s, the Mull Rally is a closed public road race using the exciting roads on the Isle of Mull.

Still only one of two in the UK, this event was the first to close the public roads for rallying over.


Iona

Doves At IonaIona is a lovely peaceful place and just seems more refined somehow than the rest of Mull. If you do manage to get to the Abbey and have some time, try to visit the rest of the Island. Iona is a stones throw off the South West corner of Mull and some say that it gets the very best of Mull’s weather, probably when the wind is south westerly that is true. If you have time, strike out for the South and West coast where you will find yet more beaches and coves. Some say that from the West coast on a good day you can see Ireland, though we remain unconvinced.


Fishing on Mull

Fishing on MullThe Fishing on Mull is terrific. For most fishing you will need a permit, though you can just get your rod out and fish for bass and Pollock off the cliffs just past Calgary Bay (as Claire is doing here). For licenses and boats, head down to either Brown’s or Tackle and Books on the Tobermory seafront for more information. Good options are to hire a boat and fish on the Mishnish Loch’s for brown trout. Fish from the bank of Loch Frisa for brown & sea trout, plus salmon. Fish for Sea trout and Salmon in River Bellart or River Aros. Or get yourself a place on a boat for easy Mackerel or Pollock.


Fishing on Mull – Aros Loch

Located in the beautiful setting of Aros Park which you can see from Tigh-na-acha across the harbour. Access is either a 2k walk from Tobermory Harbour or by car from the Salen Road. Stocked with Rainbow Trout, this loch is well sheltered so a better place to be if the weather is wet / windy.

Full details and permits are available from Browns in Tobermory – 01688 302020.


The roads on Mull

The roads on MullThe roads on Mull are mostly single track with passing spaces so keep your wits about you. This road goes from Dervaig to Torloisk and is not well travelled as most tourists take the coast road past Calgary Bay. You may see grass growing down the middle of some roads. The waterfall and views over Ulva make this route worth taking once in a while. Getting used to driving on single track roads can take a while but just keep a note of where the last passing place was and slow down whilst going round blind corners. Once you have the hang of it the roads are a lot of fun, hence the Mull Rally which takes place on public roads over a weekend in October.


Subsidised Travel to Mull for All

Subsidised Travel to Mull for AllThe Scottish government are subsidising travel to Mull with their RET scheme.

The cost of travel for islanders to the mainland was getting out of hand and also affecting the tourism trade, making people holidaying think twice. The RET scheme subsidises everyone’s ferry fares drastically. By our estimate the discount is around 60% for foot passengers and vehicles, which you will hopefully agree is pretty significant. The best thing is you don’t have to jump through any hoops to take advantage of this, the travel prices on the CalMac site already include the RET subsidy.

Check the Mull fares on https://www.calmac.co.uk/ret/about, with Oban / Craignure probably being the route most visitors to Tigh-na-acha will want to take.

Thank to the Scottish government for this gesture, it has made everyone on the islands a bit happier, though consider booking your ferry a bit earlier than normal because they may be a bit busier.


Otters

Otters At Kilninnian, Isle of MullOtters normally keep well away from humans, but if you are lucky, and not too noisy you may see one of these playful creatures messing around in the seaweed – or like this one, basking in the sun. Ok, it’s not a very good picture but that really is an Otter in the middle of the view. This was taken at Kilninian (Port an t-sruthain). We have seen Otters at Croig, Langamull (and Mink here), the cliffs just past Calgary, here at Kilninian and Croggan on the East coast. We imagine that they could be found anywhere on Mull which is quiet, remote and has seaweed cover.